ENERGY DEPARTMENT’S DISTRIBUTED WIND INDUSTRY UPDATE: A WINDEXCHANGE WEBINAR


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Compared with traditional, centralized power plants, distributed wind energy installations supply power directly to homes, farms, schools, businesses, manufacturing facilities, and communities. Turbines used in these applications can range in size from a few hundred watts to several megawatts. The Energy Department and its Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently published the 2015 Distributed Wind Market Report, which shows that U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a cumulative installed capacity of more than 934 megawatts from approximately 75,000 turbines—enough to power more than 142,000 average American homes.

One segment of the distributed wind industry involves wind turbines deployed in the built environment: in, on, or near buildings. The built-environment wind turbine niche of the wind industry is still developing and is relatively less mature than the utility-scale wind or traditional distributed wind sectors. The Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently published Deployment of Wind Turbines in the Built Environment: Risks, Lessons, and Recommended Practices, a report that investigates the current state of the BEWT industry by reviewing available literature on BEWT projects as well as interviewing project owners on their experiences deploying and operating the technology.

To learn more about the U.S. distributed wind industry, join WINDExchange for a free webinar on September 28. Alice Orrell of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will present highlights from the 2015 Distributed Wind Market Report, and Heidi Tinnesand from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory will present findings from Deployment of Wind Turbines in the Built Environment: Risks, Lessons, and Recommended Practices. Although the webinar is free, registration is required.

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